Trending Then: Jogging, He-undies, and More

 

In honor of our centennial, we’ve dug deep into a century’s worth of Alcalde issues to bring you a fascinating look at how the Forty Acres has changed over the years.

runningcover1982

Jogging

In 1982, a revolutionary new sport hit the Forty Acres: jogging! Back in the good ol’ days, running was simply a way to get from Point A to Point B, but the jogging fad changed that forever. The little-known activity was part of a “fitness craze” sweeping the UT campus. The July 1982 issue of the Alcalde explained: “Students (not just athletes) can be seen jogging around the Memorial Stadium track any time of the day or night (jogging shorts and sweatshirts are ‘in’), pumping iron, or sweating off the pounds in exercise or dance classes.”

1916

Turn-of-the-Century Fashion

Remember when freshman caps, bat-wing ties, and Daniel Webster collars were all the rage? Neither do we. But in 1916, students were sporting these cutting-edge fashions all across campus. “The senior academs will begin wearing dress collars and bat-wing ties soon,” reads an article in the December 1916 Alcalde. “They will also, as formerly, carry canes on certain days. The senior laws have already begun wearing Daniel Webster collars and black-string ties on every Tuesday and Friday.” Less fortunate engineering students had to wear boring old khaki trousers and blue shirts. Drat!

1928

He-undies

This 1928 trend is hard for us to wrap our heads around. “The latest sartorial assault on male virility is flowered underwear for the collegians who follow fads,” reported the January 1928 Alcalde. “The he-undies are yellow and pink fiber silk with large colored flowers scattered about the fabric. Gosh! However, this too must be told; a haberdasher said he sold more of the dainties to women than to men.”

 

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